Burrata: A Heart of Cream and Mozzarella
Burrata: A Heart of Cream and Mozzarella
Burrata: A Heart of Cream and Mozzarella
11/06/2017

Burrata: A Heart of Cream and Mozzarella


Burrata has a distinctive sweet and slightly sour taste and a soft, milky, seductive texture. It comes as little surprise that its popularity has spread all over the world.

The recipe for burrata was devised in the early twentieth century on a farm in the town of Andria. It consists of strings of mozzarella mixed with fresh cream and wrapped in a mozzarella casing. Burrata is usually spherical or pear-shaped with a diameter of 7-10cm and a weigh varying from 300g to 1kg, whereas burratine are smaller and weigh about 100g. Each stage of the production is carried out manually. Cow’s milk is filtered, pasteurised and acidified by means of natural whey starters. Natural whey starters are obtained from the part of the previous day’s production, which is left to acidify at room temperature. Burrata of Andria was awarded a protected geographical indication (IGP) by the European Union in 2016. A Consortium for the Protection and Promotion of Burrata of Andria IGP was inaugurated in February 2017.

Burrata: nutritional properties
Burrata ranks top by nutritional value among fresh cheeses, with 396 Kcal per 100g and a variety of vitamins, including A, D, E, B1, B2, PP. The large quantity of minerals like calcium and phosphor contributes greatly to metabolic reactions as well as bone and tissue formation. The protein content amounts to 15%, whereas fats are equivalent to virtually 35%. Since two thirds of the fat content consists of saturated fats, burrata ought not to be consumed in large amounts.

Burrata: organoleptic properties
Burrata has a delicate, milky fragrance, with a slightly sour note. Inside the soft, elastic and stringy rind hides a heart of rich cream and mozzarella shreds. Its taste is fresh and very dairy-like, that is sweet and with a buttery texture. Burrata can be enjoyed plain or cut in big chunks and seasoned with a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil and a sprinkle of freshly-ground pepper. It is commonly served with fresh cherry tomatoes and basil. To fully appreciate its organoleptic properties, it is best served cold. Nonetheless, it can be used to stuff oven-baked vegetables or ravioli, garnished with very light sauces. Good wine pairings include white wines with floral notes, good structure and good acidity.





Burrata: A Heart of Cream and Mozzarella

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